Metals & Alloys-- Preparation & Fabrication ;360201 -- Ceramics, Cermets, & Refractories

Title Army P/M research and development overview. Final report

Creator/Author Dowding, R.J. ; Wells, M.G. ; Crowson, A.

Publication Date 1993 May 01

OSTI Identifier OSTI ID: 6035905

Report Number(s) AD-A-266921/6/XAB;ARL-TRó140

Resource Type Technical Report

Research Org Army Research Lab., Watertown, MA (United States)

Subject 360101 -- Metals & Alloys-- Preparation & Fabrication ;360201 -- Ceramics, Cermets, & Refractoriesó

Preparation & Fabrication ;450000 -- Military Technology, Weaponry, & National Defense; POWDER METALLURGY-- RESEARCH PROGRAMS;TUNGSTEN ALLOYS-- POWDER METALLURGY;US DOD-- RESEARCH PROGRAMS; ALUMINIUM ALLOYS;COLD WORKING;INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS;MOLDING;PENETRATORS;PROJECTILES;SINTERING;STEELS;TITANIUM ALLOYS

Related Subject ALLOYS;FABRICATION;IRON ALLOYS;IRON BASE ALLOYS;MATERIALS WORKING;METALLURGY;NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS;US ORGANIZATIONS

Description/

Abstract The Army uses of powder metallurgy (P/M) extend from the conventional press and sinter to the more exotic processes of liquid phase sintering of tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) and powder injection molding (PIM).

Many of the more advanced high performance applications require extensive research and development (R and D) prior to fielding of the application.^Examples arc the intense research into WHA in the last ten years.

This research has led to great understanding of these heavy alloys and application into some kinetic energy systems.

The Navy has taken great advantage of WHA by employing them iii the phalanx close-in weapon system (CIWS).

The Army intends that research will lead to an alloy or composite of tungsten that, when used as a long rod penetrator, will perform as well as, or better than, current depleted uranium (DU) penetrators.

This will allow possible replacement of the controversial DU.

Powder injection molding of WHA is an area receiving attention because of the potential for producing small and medium caliber projectiles.

The drawbacks at this time include the need to develop an alloy that does not require post sinter cold working to develop the strength required for these demanding applications.

Other possible problems include producing slender long rod projectiles with desired product straightness.

In addition to the work on tungsten alloys, a discussion is underway of other powder metallurgy R and D and is under active investigation within the Army.

These topics include aluminum and titanium alloys, intermetallics, and ultrahigh strength steels for structural and propulsion applications, as well as nonequilibrium P/M produced structures....

Powder metallurgy, Tungsten alloys, Aluminum alloys, Titanium alloys, Intermetallic.

 

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