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Let Boston Teen Jenny Ulysse and all U.S. residents return from Haiti!

Let all U.S. residents return from Haiti regardless of citizenship!
Treatment or evacuation for all needing critical medical attention!

Sign the Petition at http://iacenter.org/haiti/jennyreturn

Send a message to President Obama, former Presidents Clinton and Bush, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Vice President Joe Biden, Congressional leaders,the Congressional Black Caucus, the Massachusetts Congressional Delegation, the Boston City Council, Mass. Gov Deval Patrick, the U.N. General Assembly President, U.N. Secretary General Ban, and Major media representatives demanding that Jenny Ulysse and all U.S. residents be allowed to return home from Haiti regardless of citizenship status, and medical care or evacuation be provided for all with critical medical needs.

Sign the Petition at http://iacenter.org/haiti/jennyreturn


Jenny Ulysse is a teen-aged Boston community organizer who was in Port-au-Prince Haiti on January 12 and was injured in the earthquake. She has been unable to receive an x-ray or any medical attention for her injured foot and leg since then. Although she is a legal resident of the United States, lives here with her family and is the main breadwinner, is employed and goes to school in Boston, her efforts to return and obtain necessary medical attention are being rebuffed at the U.S. embassy because she is not a citizen.
Sign the Petition at http://iacenter.org/haiti/jennyreturn to demand that Jenny and all U.S. residents be allowed to return from Haiti regardless of citizenship status.

Jenny received a commendation plaque from Boston City Councilor Chuck Turner for her dedication as an intern in his District Office this past summer. Jenny is the main breadwinner in her household in Boston, which includes her mother and brother. She is currently employed by the Union of Minority Neighborhoods organizing for their campaign for Juvenile CORI (criminal records access) reform. She is an activist with the Bail Out the People Movement in Boston. Jenny has had her challenges growing up as a teen in Boston. Through the support of members of her community she is now enrolled at the Adult Technical Academy and confidently envisions a future as a college graduate and professional writer and poet.

On January 12, 2010 Jenny and her twin brother, Jerry, were in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, visiting her step-mother and numerous siblings, when the earthquake hit. At the time of the quake, Jenny, her beloved step-mother, Yolanda, and friends were in the family hair salon located in Port-au-Prince, more than 30 miles east from their Mariani residence, when a near by 5 story building collapsed on it. Jenny was miraculously recovered from the rubble of the salon, sustaining a leg injury, cuts and bruises. Her step-mother sustained mortal injuries and died.

In the wake of the disastrous earthquake, Jenny, Jerry and Valentine, their oldest sibling in Haiti, have been burdened with the responsibility of caring for their family unit of 18 members which includes a 10 month old baby and an elderly grandmother. Their situation is not unlike many of their fellow countrymen who have lost family, friends and the little they had to this natural disaster. Having survived the disaster, the next step is seeking humanitarian aid and medical assistance.

Over 2 million people in Haiti are in need of food, water and/or medical assistance, but thus far assistance has only reached 500,000. While 12,000 nurses have volunteered for service in Haiti, instead 12,000 soldiers have been sent. The U.S. response has been a military occupation and a blatantly racist naval blockade of 25 ships surrounding Haiti to make sure Haitians do not make it to the United States shores. Medical assistance must be gotten to all who need it or they should be allowed to obtain it in the United States.

To date Jenny's injured and swollen foot has received no medical attention or X-ray. Jenny has been to the U.S. embassy three times in an effort to return home to her family in Boston and the medical attention she needs. Although her documentation was lost in the rubble of the earthquake, Jenny knows her green card number and her social security number, and United Minority Neighborhoods and the office of Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley prevailed on John Kerry's office to fax her documents to the U.S. embassy in Port-au-Prince. But she was sent away because she was not a U.S. citizen, even though she is a legal resident with the legal right to be in the U.S.

Boston activists and the International Action Center have launched a campaign to demand Jenny and all legal U.S. residents in Haiti be allowed back to the U.S. immediately. You can sign the online petition at www.iacenter.org/haiti/jennyreturn . A Boston City Council resolution seeking Jenny's return is being planned,. as well as a planned campaign in support of Jenny in the Boston Public Schools. Labor unions like USW 8751, Boston School Bus Drivers, and community groups including the Bail Out the People Movement are getting behind the campaign.

PETITION

The text of the petition follows:

To: President Barack Obama, Former President Clinton, Former President Bush, Vice President Biden, Secretary of State Clinton, Secretary of Homeland Security Nepolitano, Black Congressional Caucus, Congressional leaders, Mass Congressional Delegation, Mass. Gov. Patrick, Boston City Council, U.N. Secretary General Ban and members of the media:

Allow Boston teenager Jenny Ulysse to return to Boston from Haiti. and all U.S. Permanent Residents to return to their homes. Medical treatment or evacuation for all in need of critical medical attention!

Jenny Ulysse is a Boston teenager and student in the Boston Public Schools. She is the main breadwinner in her household, which includes her mother and brother. She works as a community youth worker with United Minority Neighborhoods, advocating for oppressed youth in the criminal justice system. She is an activist with the Bail Out the People Movement in Boston. She received a commendation plaque from Boston City Councilor Chuck Turner for her dedication as an intern this past summer in his district office.

On January 12, 2010 Jenny was in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, visiting her step mother, when the earthquake hit. Jenny was stuck under rubble for hours, and one of her feet was badly injured, swelling greatly. From that day to this, Jenny has had no x-ray and no medical treatment for her injury.

Over 2 million people in Haiti are in need of food, water and/or medical assistance, but thus far assistance has only reached 500,000. While 12,000 nurses have volunteered for service in Haiti, instead 12,000 soldiers have been sent. The U.S. response has been a military occupation and a blatantly racist naval blockade to make sure Haitians do not make it to the United States shores. Medical assistance must be gotten to all who need it or they should be allowed to obtain it in the United States.

Jenny has been to the U.S. embassy three times in an effort to return home to her family in Boston and the medical attention she needs. Although her documentation was lost in the rubble of the earthquake, Jenny knows her green card number and her social security number, and United Minority Neighborhoods and Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley's office prevailed on John Kerry's office to fax her documents to the U.S. embassy in Port-au-Prince. But she was sent away because she was not a U.S. citizen, even though she is a legal resident with the legal right to be in the U.S.

I demand that you take immediate action to allow Jenny and all legal U.S. residents to return to the U.S from Haiti, regardless of citizenship status. I further demand that effective medical aid be provided to all in need in Haiti and any unable to get the care they need there be allowed to come to the U.S. for necessary care.

Sincerely,

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UPDATED Feb 1, 2010 11:05 PM
International Action Center • Solidarity Center • 147 W. 24th St., FL 2 • New York, NY 10011
Phone 212.633.6646 • E-mail: iacenter@iacenter.org • En Español: iac-cai@iacenter.org